The Best Part of the Day: Teaching Children Gratitude
Podcast #46 — Aired October 30, 2014

For twenty years, Sarah Ban Breathnach has been inspiring women to practice gratitude every day. This week on BetterWorldian’s Radio we’ll discuss how she’s now sharing her message with kids through a beautiful new children’s book, The Best Part of the Day. Sarah Ban Breathnach is the best-selling author of Simple Abundance. She’ll talk about how The Best Part of the Day encourages children and families to celebrate and appreciate the wonderful moments in their lives.

Sign Up for New Shows & Updates!

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Author, The Best Part of the Day
Author, Simple Abundance

Sarah Ban Breathnach is the #1 New York Times best-selling author of Simple Abundance: A Daybook of Comfort and Joy and the creator of The Simple Abundance Journal of Gratitude. Sarah's work celebrates quiet joys, simple pleasures, and well-spent moments. By reminding us to search for the small and the sweet in our daily round with appreciation and awe, we find the beauty in the everyday. Millions of women, including Oprah Winfrey agreed and discovered unexpected contentment and solace in their own lives. Now Sarah introduces the magic of gratitude to little children and their families in her debut children's book, The Best Part of The Day, a delightful and reassuring journey through the seasons. Sarah lives in Southern California near her daughter, Kate, and their beloved animals.

 

Episode Transcript

Raymond Hansell
This week on BetterWorldians Radio were talking with Sarah Ban Breathnach who has become a trusted voice to women around the world. Sarah is the #1 New York Times best­selling author of the book, Simple Abundance: A Daybook of Comfort and Joy, and the creator of The Simple Abundance Journal of Gratitude. Sarah's work celebrates quiet joys, simple pleasures, and well spent moments. By reminding us to search for the small and the sweet in our daily round with appreciation and awe, we find the beauty in the everyday. Millions of women, including Oprah Winfrey, agreed and discovered unexpected contentment and solace in their own lives. Now Sarah introduces the magic of gratitude to little children and their families in her debut children's book, The Best Part of The Day, a delightful and reassuring journey through the seasons. Sarah lives in Southern California near her daughter Kate and their beloved animals. Sarah, its a pleasure to have you join us today on BetterWorldians Radio. Welcome aboard.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Thank you very much, its a pleasure to be here.

Raymond Hansell
You know, Sarah, for our listeners who dont know, Simple Abundance, I cant imagine that they dont, was a best seller, on the Best Seller List for over two years. Tell us a little bit about Simple Abundance?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Well, that was almost 20 years ago, which is very hard for me to believe, but Simple Abundance was the classic overnight best seller in America and it only took 25 years to get there. It was my third book. I had written two previous books on Victorian Family Traditions and Victorian Nursery Companion was the second book. And I was due to, my third book was going to be Victorian Decorative Details. An author stays with the book at least two years, a year, two years. And at that time in my life, you know, I had a young daughter, I had one child, she was seven, I was trying to do it all. I had had a syndicated column with the Washington Post. I was doing a radio program. I was just very, very busy, and I was not connected to myself. And the thought of musing about ruffles and flourishes just sent me into despair. So I didnt know what to do, and this is in 1991 and its hard, you know, news is so bad now, it was bad in 1991. And there was the Great Recession it was called and people were losing their jobs in record numbers. This had been the first time this had happened in such numbers, 20,000 people laid off, 30,000 people the following week, from all types of industry. And there was a Great Depression of mood. And I remember at the time struggling to know what I wanted to write about, but also knowing that it couldnt be helpful that every time you turned on the television or heard the radio somebody was telling us how bad it was. And I pray out loud, you know, I have a conversation with God all the time, and I was just saying, you know, we can simplify our lives, but its not going to be scarcity, we can have simple abundance, and that was the first time those two words had ever come together in my head. And it was like a neon sign was flashing, and I thought, okay, but what does this mean? So that was the first, you know, the beginning of the first rumbling of Simple Abundance. And what I had discovered was that during this time, before the idea of Simple Abundance, I was experimenting on myself. Im my own spiritual research and development team. And I wanted to see if gratitude could help me in a practical way. And I came to that decision because, as Id said earlier, when I was spinning and I didnt have my center it was one morning that I took my daughter to school and when I got back, I used to write between her school hours between nine and two. And when I got back I heard a voice that Ive come to know as Spirit saying, you know, Ive had enough of this doom and gloom. I want you to sit down and I want you to give me 100 reasons why youre grateful for your life at this moment, and I dont want you to get up from the table until you do. And I call those my marching orders because Spirit is very sort of insistent when I get them. And so I did, there were many pots of tea that day, but it took me about five hours, but I finished and I had a list of over 100. And I had made myself, I could not, nothing that involved money could be on the list and that was because I was worried about money, I was worried about my freelancing, I was worried about how to pay the bills. But that was an eye-opener for me.

Raymond Hansell
So gratitude was the eye-opener for you at that particular point?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Oh, yes, because like everybody Id had those knee buckling moments when some crisis occurs and you come through it by the grace of God and, you know, thank you, thank you, but to have little mundane, the ordinary, the sacred and the ordinary on this list, you know, we had had a storm a couple of days before and Katies little cat, Mikie, who was just a kitten, six months old, had gotten lost in the storm, and we found him up on a neighbors roof, but we found him. Well, that was a tremendous, of tremendous importance to our family, and found Mikie was on the list. And the smell of a slow cooker or a pot roast in the oven, that was on the list. And the fragrance of my daughters hair after a bath, that was on the list. You know, all of those the real, the moments that I do call the sacred and the ordinary.

Raymond Hansell
Sacred and the ordinary, now essentially you introduced this concept of the gratitude journal or at least you were one of the first to do so and to express that gratitude as you just indicated with the sacred and the ordinary. Now it turns out that you were on Oprah many times and Oprah actually even gives you credit for inspiring her to begin a gratitude journal. What was that like when you found that out?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Well, Ill tell you the back story about that, when Simple Abundance was published in 1995, I worked on it for 40 years 40 years, it seems like 40 years out in the desert no, I worked on it for four years, but I was turned down 30 times over a two-year period, and I still wrote every day. And when it was finally published in November of 1995 my publisher said, you know, this is a womans book and it will sell by word of mouth. Well, I knew in the publishing industry at that time that a womans book was a euphemism for no publicity, and they didnt have any publicity. And so an idea came to me after prayer to send 30 copies of Simple Abundance to The Oprah Winfrey Show to every woman on the staff, and the idea was if its a womans book and women are going to talk about it where better for them to start talking about it than on The Oprah Winfrey Show. Well, my publisher at the time did not agree with me, but I was the squeaky wheel that wouldnt stop, you know? And I kept asking them. Finally, I said Ill pay for them, I just want you to send them so that I dont look like a desperate author sending her own book. And they said, finally, okay, really I think just to shut me up. And they were sent, and then a producer got in touch with our publisher and said, you know, the books are lovely, but theyre really not a show. And I said really a savings grace, well, you know, some day Oprah will pick the book up and shell read something that speaks to her and then itll be a show. And about two, three weeks later, no, a month later, a month later because it was the Christmas of 95 we got a call that, indeed, Oprah had she had gone into her makeup room and normally she would see, oh, a spiritual magazine, but she saw this pink book, and she said what is this pink book, I keep seeing it everywhere? And she opened up the pink book and whatever it was that she read at that moment it connected with her. And so I was invited to come on the Oprah Show, and it was the only segment in 1995 where she selected the guest. This was before the Book Club, and she had a segment called People Id Like to Have Dinner With, and she had three people and I was one of them. And so I went there in a daze, a happy daze, but I went there, and then after it was over when I got back to my home in Maryland and I wrote her a thank you note. And I sent her some of the letters this is February of 1996, so this is just it had been like three or four months after the book was just published but I started getting letters from women telling me how Simple Abundance was resonating and how much it was meaning to them and the idea that gratitude, something that seems so small, could really pivot your life view, your world view. And so I sent her some copies of some of the women, and she loved them and then invited me back and invited six women and then we taped another show, and that was the show that went out in March of 1996, and she called it life changing. And two weeks later it was on the New York Times Best Seller List and #1.

Raymond Hansell
So that changed really everything at that point.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
That changed everything. And Oprah then did start using a gratitude journal, and she did shows on the gratitude journal and she this was really something that really changed her life because gratitude is the most powerful transformative force in the cause.

Raymond Hansell
Yes, thats in our experience, thats why we started when we did our social game with gratitude as the cardinal virtue that we wanted to really to bring out right off the bat in everything we do, so it is

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Well, you know then.

Raymond Hansell
We know, and with that I think Im going to thank you for your time so far because were going to take a break, but I do want to express my gratitude right off the bat. We need to take a break right now, but when we come back Sarah Ban Breathnach and my cohost, MarySue, will talk more about Sarahs new childrens book, The Best Part of The Day. In the meantime, Id like to offer this challenge to our listeners, if you know someone whose acts, no matter how small they are, are making a big difference in the lives of other people wed love to hear about them. Send us an e-mail at Radio at BetterWorldians dot com. Well be right back.

Raymond Hansell
Hi, youre listening to BetterWorldians Radio. Were speaking right now with bestselling author Sarah Ban Breathnach, and now lets welcome back Sarah and MarySue.

MarySue Hansell
Hi, Sarah.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Hi, MarySue.

MarySue Hansell
That was a great story you told about Oprah, it was just kept me spellbound. But anyway you have a brand-new childrens book now out, called The Best Part of The Day, what inspired you to write a book for kids?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Well, I was asked, I was invited by my editor at Regnery Kids, and who was a fan of simple abundance, and wrote me a letter. I didnt know her, but she said what would a Sarah Ban Breathnach childrens book look like? And I promise no preaching or politics because Regnery does publish some political books. And I started thinking about, well, what would it look like? And, for me, everything started with the birth of my daughter and Mrs. Sharps Traditions, which was my first book and the seasons and I developed customs and rituals that went around the seasons and were very comforting. I thought then that I would like to do an old-fashioned book, but not using the words old-fashioned. I wanted to do, I mean nostalgia was very important to me. I wanted to do a book that felt soft and comforting and wrapped children.

MarySue Hansell
It does.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Thank you. Thank you. I wanted to wrap them in a state of reassurance every night because we cant control what is happening out in the world, which seems more horrific every day, but we can try to set the tone of our own homes and our home life, as much as we can. And so that was the gem of it. And Ive always wanted to do a visual book. Very I would have loved Simple Abundance to have had pictures. Im very visual, but all of my books, Mrs. Sharps Traditions had Victorian art and the nursery companion, but the after some sorry?

MarySue Hansell
No, Im saying I didnt know that, but the pictures in this book are gorgeous.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Well, thats the artist, Wendy at Olson, and she has just created a magical world, which was based on the home I had in England for 10 years. So, yes, so that was it. And I used to love the books by Tasha Tudor, and when I was reading to my daughter and when I was young I used to love the little Golden Books.

MarySue Hansell
Oh, loved them. I just ordered some of those for my grandchildren, and your book because I thought that was so great.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Thank you. Thank you. But those little books are so wonderful, arent they?

MarySue Hansell
Yes.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
So I wanted that same, you know, smile inducing magic to be in the book.

MarySue Hansell
I know what I wanted to ask you, was the process of writing a kids book really different? I would imagine it is from writing a book for an adult, and how do you go about that, how to do that?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
It was so hard, MarySue, it really was the most difficult piece of writing I think Ive ever done, and Im not being facetious. When you as I learned, I wrote so many drafts, there are so many words that are not included in this book, but its the idea of chopping down a redwood tree and then whittling it with a paring knife to a toothpick.

MarySue Hansell
Oh, dear.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
And that, yes, it was a very strenuous writing process and it took over 18 months because you cant make assumptions the way you make assumptions when youre writing for adults, sometimes, although I never Im self-taught, so I never really, you know, I found out things in Simple Abundance because I was interested in them, but children are on a much theyre on an emotional level, you cant write to the intellect. And theres an immediacy, and once you say something on the page there needs to be a picture there. It was quite a learning curve.

MarySue Hansell
Now did you have to do research or sought the expertise of someone who knew that market?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Well, my sister helped me a great deal, and certainly my editor did. Then as the illustrations, well, the first job was sort of the matchmaking between myself and Wendy Edelson, the illustrator, and we were really on the same page, and that was the first piece of magic. And then we just worked from there. I take, yes, I was starting something new. I think one of the blessings Ive had in my life is when I start something new I dont realize maybe how difficult it is, and so

MarySue Hansell
Might scare you off otherwise, right?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Yes, yes, it would scare you off, exactly. So I consider that, yes, a blessing. But it really was. I have great admiration for childrens book writers.

MarySue Hansell
So I guess it was just a natural thing for you to come up with gratitude as the first topic there in the book?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Yes, you know, people had said well, thats because its my favorite world view, but people had come to me in the 20 years of Simple Abundance and said could we do a childrens gratitude journal, could we do a childrens gratitude journal? But the idea of just writing five things down, which is what we do in Simple Abundance.

MarySue Hansell
Right.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Explaining that to a child, I didnt want to explain gratitude, I wanted them to feel because what gratitude does is theres awe and appreciation and wonder, and I wanted those to be feelings. And I thought what a wonderful thought or comfort to leave little children with at the end of the day, you know, no matter how hard the day was they found something good and positive at the end of the day. So, you know, that was always the driving force or desire.

MarySue Hansell
You know, you say that gratitude is often thought of as an intellectual concept, and youre talking about now how you disagree with that, can you explain it a little further?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Yes, the idea well, just in the listing of five things. When moments of gratitude happen we respond on an emotional level, you know, whatever it is during the day. And the reason that I started writing them down was because I wasnt used to making gratitude a creative and a spiritual practice. So I would write things down so I wouldnt forget them, thats how I came up with the gratitude journal. It was very practical in the beginning. And, but as I said, its hard to do that with little children, and they respond when they splash in a puddle, when they find a ladybug on a leaf, you know?

MarySue Hansell
Yes.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
I mean theyre really there, theyre in the moment, and their glee, their glee at the new discovery is the gratitude. So because were supposed to be gleeful, and its so hard in this world today. So it was very difficult for me to understand that Simple Abundance had changed so many lives, but its not difficult for me and Im so overwhelmed with thanks that I can plant seeds of gratitude in the hearts of little children right now. I feel that is work thats calling to me right now.

MarySue Hansell
I think its wonderful work. And I love the idea of that reading a bedtime story to the kids every night and the grandkids about gratitude. I think its just a wonderful idea, and it comes it seems like it comes naturally to them once you start them on that process. As youre saying, they can picture the beautiful things that happened to them that day and things that made them happy and the things they had this emotional response to. Is that what you were going after?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Well, yes, and its the really small things. You know, they can pet the cat and shell start to purr, and they make so many connections. Gratitude is like the spark, and then they make so many connections with it. And its something thats fun, its something they look forward to. And with The Best Part of The Day because of the illustrations they look forward to just living in the world of the pictures and seeing the world that families of animals and how they mirror the children, and it just really feels like a wonderful old-fashioned book.

MarySue Hansell
It does, the whole feels nostalgic to me and made me feel really good and warm inside. I couldnt wait to read it to the children. What do you think adults can learn from children about gratitude and how they express it?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Not to intellectualize it I think. I think we can end that gratitude is meant to be. In its divine impulse, its meant to be spontaneous, its meant to be a connection with a greater power who does care for us, who does want to help us, who is there waiting for us to ask for guidance and wisdom, whatever, but its spontaneous. It is what the 13th Century Germanistic Meister Eckhart meant, I think, when he said if the only prayer you ever say in your whole life is thank you it will be enough.

MarySue Hansell
One of my favorite quotes.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
I know, isnt that, I mean that is the Cosmos in a sentence. And but thats the connection, I think, thats meant by it, its the spontaneity and the frequent expression of it. Thats how gratitude helps us change inwardly.

MarySue Hansell
Yes, I love gratitude meditations, myself. And I did read your book, I hate to admit 20 years ago, but it was wonderful and still is. And I think the practice is so good for adults and even just as good, if not better, for children. How can parents demonstrate gratitude in front of their children?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Well, I think children learn by what they see. I think if we express gratitude, if you say thank you to your husband, thank you for doing that for me. If the child does his chores or what, thank you for taking the garbage out for me, thank you for bringing your plate over to the sink, you know? I mean if our children are used to hearing their mother and their father say thank you then it becomes a more natural occurrence. It becomes, it is what I mean when I say the sacred in the ordinary.

MarySue Hansell
And I think one feels so good when you say thank you to them. Do you ever notice the real happy glint in their eye, and even when the children see you say thank you to another adult or someone else it seems to make everybody happy. And, as you say, it gives you a really good emotional feeling.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
And it gives you a connection, even when youre at the supermarket and youre checking out, thanking the bag woman or bag boy or thanking the cashier. I mean you have a smile and you have, you know, your eyes meet and youre connected, and I think thats what thats one of the things that were all missing now with being so plugged in to the ether is that were missing connections.

MarySue Hansell
Yes, youre right, although you can say thank you in social media, but I dont know if it has the same oomph that it does in person and face-to-face. I just wanted to ask you my last question here about there were such beautiful things you put in the book, did you use some maybe memories from when either your own childhood or that of the time you spent with your daughter?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Yes, its a combination of both, mainly its her childhood. My mother was great at birthday parties and Halloween costumes, and it was really the Victorian mothers that I read about when I was doing Mrs. Sharps Tradition. I had discovered a trunk load, this is in 1982, of womens and childrens Victorian periodicals and I bought them all. And it became a time machine for me, but the traditions, the customs, they were all built around the seasons, I did with my own daughter. And they were so reassuring for me as an adult that I missed not doing them again, and then I realized, well, you can do them for yourself, you know, you can create a ritual for yourself. So, yes, it really is past memories brought into the present.

Raymond Hansell
We need to take another break. When we come back well talk more with Sarah Ban Breathnach about her new childrens book, The Best Part of The Day. Be right back.

Raymond Hansell
Were back now with Sarah Ban Breathnach, the bestselling author of Simple Abundance and the new childrens book, The Best Part of The Day.

Gregory Hansell
Hi, Sarah, this is Greg.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Hi, Greg.

Gregory Hansell
You know, I wanted to tell you that last night I read The Best Part of The Day to my three-year-old daughter, Tabby, and she really loved it.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Oh, the perfect age for it.

Gregory Hansell
And it put her in a wonderful mood for bedtime, so I owe you a thank you for that.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Oh, thank you. I hope there are many more, many more. The young children, Ive noticed that the age between like three and 10 and how the littles, as I call the three year olds and four year olds, theyre fascinated with the animals, little animal families.

Gregory Hansell
Yes, yes.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
And then as they get a little bit older, five or six, they start knowing, noticing repeat of the seasons.

Gregory Hansell
Yes.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
And how the year is moving on. And then, I thought, well, maybe it was going to be too old for nine or 10, but now Im hearing from them and from their parents and grandparents and they are starting to notice the magic of gratitude.

Gregory Hansell
Yes.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
And the appreciation, so Im just so blessed.

Gregory Hansell
She definitely noticed the pictures and, at first, thats what we would talk about. But heres the thing I wanted to tell you that I thought was really interesting. I noticed that generally when Tabby is doing something she really loves shell actually sometimes stop and say Im so happy right now, Daddy, you know, just really sweet. And that positively affects her demeanor for the rest of the day. And I was thinking about that last night because one thing that Tabby liked that she noticed in addition to the pictures was not just the repetition of the season, but how in the book you have repeated with every season, you know, is now its time to cuddle up again and say what youre grateful for, and she noticed that repetition. And that made me think about how in a gratitude practice you need that kind of repetition, and I wanted to ask you was that part of your thinking that you wanted to convey to kids, to kind of teach that habit without kind of having to intellectualize it to them?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Yes, I suppose it was. Im really thrilled that shes responding that way, and thats terrific news. I wanted, I just wanted them I didnt want it to be more facts. I didnt want it to be more, you know, more rules. I wanted it I know that I wanted the impulse to sort of be spontaneous because you hear that glee in Tabbys voice when she says, you know, Im so happy, you know? Thats the connection that I wanted to do, but it is the repetition. You cant just do it at Thanksgiving or I mean thats why I started writing it down because and its still, Im amazed at how gratitude and the gratitude journal still work, but you have to do it, and you cant do it in your head, you know? Were working on like a coloring book and a little journal so that parents can write down things and then the children can color because thats the next practice that I want to introduce them to. In order for gratitude to work it has to be acknowledged and appreciated, and I think that that comes by keeping it bearing witness to the days blessings in the written form, at least thats what Ive discovered. Ive discovered on the days that Im falling asleep because Im so exhausted and Im thinking, oh, Im grateful for this and this and this, and I can get out of the habit in a few days and then I wonder why Im so cranky. Its because I havent done my gratitude ritual, and I think thats why if this becomes as natural as brushing our teeth and saying our prayers or cuddling I think that when it becomes that natural thats when the magic will really start to take hold.

Gregory Hansell
Yes, thats interesting. I know that you talk a bit about the importance of creating memories with your children and thats happened, and I guess thats part of the same thing, you know, that we have to create those memories so that they begin to notice this repetition and they begin to do this again and again, to have the gratitude. How do you think busy parents can find the time to do that? How do we purposefully create these memories with our kids?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
I think that we purposely create memories with our kids. I think that we say, all right, there will be, you know, when were reading. And there are days when you dont get home or you cant get away, but that therell be somebody who puts the child to bed, who will do the ritual with them. That you create moments that are inviolate, you know, that you have a blessing before meals or that you, for parents that once you come home until you get through dinner and the nighttime begins you park your phone or your computer on the desk. We need to create boundaries, and I think that boundaries inwardly and outwardly. And that gives us the idea of the purposeful rituals. And the seasons help really, in all of the hundred centuries of the world the seasons have been the same. Theyre getting a little bit sharper now, but the seasons have been the same. Thats what the Victorian parents did, and thats what Ive done in my earlier work, and thats why I wanted because its so crucial I wanted to bring that back to children again. Use the seasons, use the distinction between night and day. Children love rituals and they love boundaries, we all do, we love knowing whats in, we know the protection, were hungering for that as adults, and our kids are, too.

Gregory Hansell
Yes, I love the way you put that because, obviously, the seasons and also twilight and the different times of the day have always been part of the great spiritual traditions of the world. I know that you write in your book that the grace of gratitude is a creative and spiritual practice that anchors our lives in appreciation and wonder. So you are really trying to draw that connection between that same kind of wonder connected with the seasons and connected with the appreciation of everyday life, and seeing gratitude as totally related to that?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Oh, yes. Oh, yes. Gratitude is the big word, and but appreciation and wonder. I think that we really have seven physical senses, you know? Its sight and its hearing and its taste and its feeling, and its what am I missing? And then theres knowing.

Gregory Hansell
Right.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Intuition, I think, we call it the sixth sense, but I really think the seventh sense is wonder.

Gregory Hansell
Yes.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
And I think, yes, bringing its the spark, catching the wonder, thats what gratitude does for us. And, oh, its so when you see wonder and happiness in children you just want to hug them, you just want to hug yourself, you just want to hug everything, you want to hug a tree, you know what I mean? Its

Gregory Hansell
Its true. No, its like what you were saying to my mother a few minutes ago that one of the things that we can learn from children are when you see them stop and have that moment of awe and wonder and appreciation it reawakens that in yourself, thats part of the magic I think.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Yes, absolutely.

Gregory Hansell
Well, theres another great quote you just reminded me of from the book, all we have is all we need, and all we need is the awareness of how blessed we really are. Can you talk a little bit about that and how that connects to that same wonder and awe of gratitude?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Well, this connects in a really practical way because we can find ourselves at any moment of the day, whether unexpected people are coming over for dinner and we didnt plan for it, and then Ill say, okay, all we have is all we need, all we have is all we need.

Gregory Hansell
Right.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
And then you go into the pantry and you see 30 different things that you can put together for a meal. When the car breaks down and youre waiting, and you need to get somewhere, but you have an extra battery, halo battery for your phone so youre able to make that call, all we have is all we need. And if you play that game see, I see the things that connect us, as trying to play with me, as if the universe is saying just try us out, just play with us. And all we have is all we need is one of those. But and the thing is, too, like the first time, the first impulse to write down those 100 things to show me how rich. You know, it wasnt money. I was really wealthy in the things that mattered my health, my daughters health, a roof over our head. I mean, you know, its sort of a reality check. I think and I really mean this that if we know where our children are and can put them to sleep safely at the end of every day in our own home we are so blessed.

Gregory Hansell
Yes.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Because the blessing of gratitude is not only how much we have, but how much weve escaped.

Gregory Hansell
Sure.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
And I think thats what we forget, and thats why all we have is all we need, except the awareness of how much we have.

Gregory Hansell
Well, let me ask you one last question, and we only have about two-and-a-half minutes left in the segment, unfortunately, but Im really enjoying this conversation. Thank you. I asked many of our guests the same question week to week, and in your case I want to know how do you hope that your books, Simple Abundance and The Best Part of The Day and the Journals and everything, are helping to make the world a better place?

Sarah Ban Breathnach
Well, I certainly thats my intention because I see my work in the world as a calling, and Ive been asked by Spirit to go out. And Ive found the sacred in the ordinary and the sacred in the everyday. And I wanted women in Simple Abundance it was written from a womans perspective, and now Mrs. Sharps Traditions was written for men and women raising families, and now the childrens book. I wanted them to be happy. I want them to feel comfort and to be not afraid, and I find that a very sacred calling for all of us to protect the ones that we love the best we can. And we will make can you imagine what a world would be like if we had a generation of children who grew up looking every day for the best part of the day? Can you imagine if a generation of people, and what youre trying to do with A Better World, I mean what does that look like? The world, its not going to look like it is right now.

Raymond Hansell
Thats exactly what we think, and thats why we are on a mission to do exactly that, and to really be inspired by your book and by your works. We highly recommend this book to everybody, everybody who has children, who has access to kids, mothers, grandmothers, grandfathers to get a book. This is a wonderful book called, The Best Part of The Day, and also by going to SimpleAbundance.com. Sarah, wed like to thank you for joining us today on BetterWorldians Radio. Its been a real joy.

Sarah Ban Breathnach
It has been a real joy. Thank you so much for thinking of me, and I hope this isnt the only conversation we ever have.

Raymond Hansell
Oh, I hope its not either, were looking forward to many, many more. Join us next week on BetterWorldians Radio, when well be speaking with Aria Finger, the COO of DoSoemthing.org, an organization that helps young people tackle campaigns that impact a multitude of causes from poverty, to bullying, to the environment. And as we end our show every week we like to share our BetterWorldians mission. We strive here to make the world a better place by encouraging the very best in everyone. We focus on positive thinking, positive values, and positive actions. In short, our vision is to bring out the BetterWorldian in everybody so that we can all make it A Better World. Until next time, be a BetterWorldian.